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Signs of a player in the groove

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  • Signs of a player in the groove

    What would you say are the outward signs of a man who is playing his personal best ? Lack of complaint, absent minded concentration, more friendly or vocal than usual? Also are these characteristics outward signs of the inner peace and satisfaction brought about by the good play or do they have as much of a role in the success as making good shots?

  • #2
    Hi guys,

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BDsv138RcU0

    dude abides
    "OLD" Forum Participation

    Entry Date: 18-JAN-2011
    Posts: 1813
    Thank You: 1048

    "Be water, my friends"

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    • #3
      Hi guys,

      On a bit more "serious" vein?

      I think a good "sign" of playing at one's best is even temperament.

      I, myself have never....and I cannot recall ANYone with whom I've associated, who has ever,,, demonstrated the anger, frustration, outbursts, etc. that we see so often on the course, and performed at their BEST?

      Whatever happens; happens. Always follow a "bad" shot with a "GOOD" shot?

      If you keep your cool while you shoot 110? You're not in the "Zone", you're just a somewhat ineffective golfer....
      If you keep your cool when you shank your wedge into #10 while you were on your way to your best round?
      Nothing external caused you to hit that bad shot (or series of bad shots?).... YOU caused them!
      Get over yourself and look forward.

      The turbulence in the wake of a boat is reflective of what has happened in the PAST?
      Not that to which we are looking so optimistically forward in the future; (nor indicative of the Present.)
      The water in FRONT of the boat is often clear and calm....

      "Inner peace" comes from LIFE; not GOLF?
      Just don't forget to bring it to the Course?

      Be water, my friends

      dude abides
      Last edited by COSTA103; 2 weeks ago.
      "OLD" Forum Participation

      Entry Date: 18-JAN-2011
      Posts: 1813
      Thank You: 1048

      "Be water, my friends"

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      • #4
        Also heard it as "be the thermostat, not the thermometer". Kind of like the "boat wake" analogy better. Like being in the moment so that I can really enjoy the few occasions of pure focus. "I love when a plan comes together", even if it occasionally requires an effective "self talk" . I recently played on an Air Force base course called Gator Lakes. While playing in and out of focus I was entertained by the joking and laughter of a few retired airmen, one of whom was somewhat disabled. They seemed more intent on building each other up rather than one upping each other. Kind of like brothers. Not to say there was no teasing, just seemed it was followed up by positive reinforcement. I think that's called unity of purpose.
        These things combined with occasional close encounters with large gators gave me no time to dwell on mistakes.
        Probably not the best thing to always rely on externals, need to develop effective self talk to survive those times when I begin feeling sorry.
        Last edited by papahajek; 2 weeks ago.

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        • #5
          The reaction displayed on the outside is usually a poor description of what's happening on the inside! Each person may require a different method of self focus to drive the high performance engine for that time frame. Some of my best archery tournament performance results seemed like I had a terrible war with my inner self that day, but in fact was as far from that perceived reality. It just was what I needed to force my self to focus on the job at hand. Golf is the same way.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by COSTA103 View Post
            I think a good "sign" of playing at one's best is even temperament. I, myself have never....and I cannot recall ANYone with whom I've associated, who has ever,,, demonstrated the anger, frustration, outbursts, etc. that we see so often on the course, and performed at their BEST?
            Hi guys,
            Hi Dude,

            When I read this part of the Dude's post I couldn't help but remember one time when a golf buddy of mine was in a greenside bunker and he was seriously demonstrating anger, frustration, and outbursts like I'd never encountered before on the course . . . his first swing sand came out but no ball; second swing sand came out but no ball; third swing sand came out but no ball; and then it was just one furious swing after another with nothing but a seemingly continuous stream of sand flying out of the bunker but no ball, he must have made ten swings and nothing but sand flying through the air. I wanted to laugh but I thought it best to remain silent lest I further provoke his anger. Needless to say he didn't perform his best that day! Thankfully, regardless of how I've performed and despite feeling frustrated with myself at times, I've always had an even temperament on the course.

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            • #7
              So Cally, we would like to know how he got it out. My first impression about your story was that the ball wasn't there. BTW you are a good friend!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Ron I View Post
                So Cally, we would like to know how he got it out. My first impression about your story was that the ball wasn't there. BTW you are a good friend!
                Hey Ron?
                Aren't we being a bit presumptuous when we suggest that he did EVER get the ball OUT?
                It might be still IN there? DIBS!

                dude abides

                ......and yes, Cally is INDEED a good friend.
                "OLD" Forum Participation

                Entry Date: 18-JAN-2011
                Posts: 1813
                Thank You: 1048

                "Be water, my friends"

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Ron I View Post
                  So Cally, we would like to know how he got it out. My first impression about your story was that the ball wasn't there. BTW you are a good friend!
                  Hi Ron,

                  He did finally manage to extricate himself from that bunker, but I don't know how he did it. My vantage point of that episode was from the other side of the green. And it was a good thing I wasn't that close to him. This was a number of years ago, but as I recall, his club made its way back to the golf cart via a 20 yard throw! He isn't a terrible golfer; he just had a bad day, and he certainly lost his cool on that occasion.

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                  • #10
                    Cally yeah we all experience someone's frustration with him when things are going poorly. I'm glad he got it out or as Costa casually commented causing a conspiracy about your buddies sand play that maybe he tossed another ball out onto the green and the ball still remains in the bunker.

                    When golfing with my buddies and someone is struggling on a hole with multiple misses, the rest of us just keep quiet. However, it is brought up when things are going better. I remember quite a few years ago my ball was in a greenside bunker. My first attempt out kept it in the same bunker but with a steep uphill lie. My third bunker shot sailed over the green and into another bunker. My buddies were ready to bust out laughing. They couldn't even look at one another for fear of laughing out loud. My fourth bunker shot sailed over the green and into the same bunker I started in. My fifth bunker shot finally got the ball out and onto the green. And I do remember taking some extra sand shots out of frustration. I don't know if there is a penalty for practicing in the sand with a club after your shot or not. But it is better than throwing my club. I know this bad experience should be long forgotten. However, it is my buddies reminding me about it when we tee up on that same hole and we laugh about it.

                    I believe they bring it up to try and get into my head, but I laugh about it. I try to be even tempered all the time. Laughing at my misfortunes seems to help even when I am reminded about my futile bunker play again and again.

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                    • #11
                      Hi guys,

                      I hear you Ron . . . I think bunker shots can be one of the most dreaded shots we as amateurs can face, but I don't fear these shots like I used to. I have to say that this one little nugget that Shawn shared in this video (starting just after the 5:00 minute mark) made all the difference for me. And if he hadn't pointed this out I probably would have never noticed this on my own. It has to do with setting up with the ball lined up with the hosel because there's a difference between where the club will pass through the sand at dynamic impact when you hover the club above the ball in the bunker at address. Just like Shawn shows in this video, I used to have a tendency in the bunker of glancing the ball off of the toe because I wasn't making the proper set-up adjustment for where the club would actually pass through the sand during impact.

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