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Do you see the ball from the side, top, or behind?

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  • Do you see the ball from the side, top, or behind?

    When taking your address, do you guys see the ball from the side, top, or behind? Does that make sense? I'm shorter so I tend to look at it from the side. Something is telling me it might make more sense to look more at the back of the ball as it's more in line with attacking the target.

    What do you guys think?

  • #2
    In my former days, when I had the ball as my target, I concentrated for a while on a certain dimple area on the back of the ball, where the clubface should come from the inside to achieve a draw. During the past 3 years with WIG, the ball is just a blur, nearly not there.
    Shawn advocates to see the grass under the ball which he then intends to cut.
    That is not for me.
    Basically my best shots happen, if I swing the club like in a practice swing, throw it to the target. My focus is then 100% to the release/throw out there and zero to the ball. I fully rely, that due to my set up work, the ball is perfectly positioned in the upcoming club path.
    I am very strong ball bound, that is my idea, to avoid any ball focus, which then perfectly gets me to all the bad things, like OTT, early release, no weight shift, chicken wing.

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    • #3
      Hi guys,

      There is some really interesting material on "Don't Look at the Ball" thread on the old Forum:


      http://forum.wisdomingolf.com/index....&Itemid=225​

      Take a look.
      Some may find it interesting?

      dude abides


      "OLD" Forum Participation

      Entry Date: 18-JAN-2011
      Posts: 1813
      Thank You: 1048

      "Be water, my friends"

      Comment


      • #4
        I'm going to answer the way I believe most target-bound people would... I have no idea!

        Shawn says the ball is a blur when he swings because it's not his focus. Try focusing on target while looking at the ball. What I mean... Whether it's intermediate target, target line, or target itself. Use your peripheral to see the target. Once you get good at this, then you can begin to use your mind's eye to see the target. Shawn always talks about swinging into the picture for a reason after all!

        I don't like to mark my ball with a sharpie for the simple reason that a marking draws my brains attention away from the target.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks guys.

          Unfortunately, I still tend to become ball focused. I'm thinking about the target and where I want the momentum to go...is that enough? Or is it more than that? Focus is a strong word! Also, I've yet to give control to gravity yet. The grass whip has taught me the correct snapping, control-less release, but I still haven't got to trusting gravity.

          The elephant walk drill is helping me with my overswing (resulting in loss of tilt), now I think I need to go back to the one-legged drill. I tend to early extend and not get that front hip out of the way. The one-legged drill should help that. I used to shoot mid-80s when I did the one-legged drill regularly, now I'm back to mid 90s! It's a long journey I suppose!
          Last edited by sdieselol; 02-21-2016, 09:08 PM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by sdieselol View Post
            Also, I've yet to give control to gravity yet. The grass whip has taught me the correct snapping, control-less release, but I still haven't got to trusting gravity.
            Hi guys,
            Hi sdieselol,

            I don't know if you saw these videos yet, but here are some things to practice to help you (and me too) get better at giving up control and trusting gravity . . .




            And here's an exercise you can try at the range to trust your dynamic set-up and allow you to focus better on swinging the weight of the ACU to the target while knowing that the ball, grass, ground will be in the way . . .


            Comment


            • #7
              Traditionally, I have always kept my eyes on the ball... Just because that's what I was told. With just now learning WIG style, I have been practicing my focus with the eyes in other places. I like the idea of focusing on the grass underneath the ball, but obviously... You can't see that when the ball is there. So, I thought it would the closest thing to focus the eyes on the closest dimple to the ground behind the ball with thinking about clipping the grass. Any thoughts?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Glink@Cinci View Post
                Traditionally, I have always kept my eyes on the ball... Just because that's what I was told. With just now learning WIG style, I have been practicing my focus with the eyes in other places. I like the idea of focusing on the grass underneath the ball, but obviously... You can't see that when the ball is there. So, I thought it would the closest thing to focus the eyes on the closest dimple to the ground behind the ball with thinking about clipping the grass. Any thoughts?
                ​Hi guys,

                I neglected to post this video earlier in the thread . . .



                It's about how we need to see things at address. Shawn mentions different viable options for the visual that works best for us individually, including the classic DLAB approach that "costa dude" came up with. In Shawn's case he looks at the space between the sole of the club and the ball. However, whichever option we choose, Shawn says the key is don't try to hit the spot we focus on, but rather (and I'm paraphrasing here) we need to see and feel an action THROUGH, not AT.

                Comment


                • GravityGenius
                  GravityGenius commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Just remember - golf is played very well by blind golfers- where do they look?

                • Cally
                  Cally commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Actually this very point was alluded to in the costa dude DLAB thread with the video where Shawn executes golf shots while blindfolded.

              • #9
                I think I play my best, and most accurate shots when I keep the ball position in sight until my back shoulder carries it around, after the ball has been struck. I think that this keeps my eyes and therefore head from moving prematurely. I'm not referring to vertical head movement from a squat, but linear from a sway or head rotation.
                Last edited by papahajek; 05-11-2016, 12:48 PM.

                Comment


                • #10
                  Papahejek,
                  Viewed from a camera showing the head movement against a background, no golfer in the history of the game has kept their head still from address to impact. To attribute poor shots to head movement is a fallacy and therefore to validate technique by referring to the concept should be something that you question.

                  While your focus of sight on the ball gives you the impression of keeping your head still, video will show you that it doesn't remain still (laterally). The purpose of my post isn't to necessarily disagree with your technique but the reasoning for it isn't valid.

                  If you try to figure this game out mostly on your own, hopefully that perspective may help you in your journey.

                  Time

                  Comment


                  • papahajek
                    papahajek commented
                    Editing a comment
                    True, but some of the best pros subscribe to that swing thought. Obviously there is a difference between perceived and actual motion, but if I start flipping my head around because someone said "it doesn't matter", I find my accuracy percentage suffers. A blind man may not be affected by not "keeping his eye on the ball", but I find that I am. I know that my head moves, but my eyes move independently and are therefore able to remain focused on the ball position until my shoulder, or at my age, lack of flexibility carries my head around.
                    When I began playing I would turn my head to try and pick up the ball flight so I wouldn't lose it. I am gradually finding that I lose less balls, and score better by trusting good mechanics as opposed to good eyesight

                • #11


                  Hi Guys

                  I get the sense that material in this video - where the eyes maintain a connection to where the momentum is headed results in the experience of the 'steady head' in relation to the resulting shot to target is important to the discussion..

                  is the head still anatomically capable of moving during the swing with these concepts in play ? absolutely - but what is our experience or perception of it as our eyes are maintaining an external focus and connection to our intention?

                  the likely answer is that we would experience it as if we had kept our head still ..in that our connection to where we want to be is consistent..

                  it's also worth noting that while we receive visual input from our eyes - we actually see with our brains ..so the inputs and focus create our perception(s)..

                  perhaps resulting in a sense of 'stillness' and things happening 'around you' ..

                  perhaps its too fine a point to put on this..

                  perhaps not..?

                  cheers for now

                  k_f
                  from the hidden Ravine below 13th at CN G&CC
                  tu nunquam hic

                  Secret Swing Tech c/o Pigaman @ Crackpot Labs

                  wisdomingolf.com/index.php?option=com_ku...&id=47972&Itemid=225

                  let energy instead of style define you.

                  Proud Member 'Quote Yourself Club'

                  Comment


                  • #12
                    What is right edge? Your intermediate point?
                    Is that what Shawn recommends to visually focus on?

                    Comment


                    • #13
                      Originally posted by kid_fullerene View Post


                      Hi Guys

                      I get the sense that material in this video - where the eyes maintain a connection to where the momentum is headed results in the experience of the 'steady head' in relation to the resulting shot to target is important to the discussion..

                      is the head still anatomically capable of moving during the swing with these concepts in play ? absolutely - but what is our experience or perception of it as our eyes are maintaining an external focus and connection to our intention?

                      the likely answer is that we would experience it as if we had kept our head still ..in that our connection to where we want to be is consistent..

                      it's also worth noting that while we receive visual input from our eyes - we actually see with our brains ..so the inputs and focus create our perception(s)..

                      perhaps resulting in a sense of 'stillness' and things happening 'around you' ..

                      perhaps its too fine a point to put on this..

                      perhaps not..?

                      cheers for now

                      k_f
                      Good points, just need to dig it a
                      ​​​​little deeper so it's in the context the becomes practical.

                      Comment


                      • #14
                        I recently reread a list written by Nick Faldo on his method for striking consistently crisp iron shots. One of the things he found useful he described as keeping his chin pointed at the ball.
                        I tried this and found it opened space for a freer back swing. The only problem I found was that I had to think to do it thus distracting my focus. I do plan on continuing to practice and PMD using this slightly raised head position in order to retrain my sub conscious swing position. His reasoning was more in the "don't move your head" camp, but I like the feeling as I tend to force my chin down into my neck.
                        If anyone is interested in the full list it is in the February 2011 issue of Golf Digest.

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                        • #15
                          Score better when I see the "whole ball"
                          But I do see the "part of the ball" like the top /front/inside of the ball when attempting a certain type shot

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