Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Hitting a fairway wood on a down hill slope

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Hitting a fairway wood on a down hill slope

    At a course I play, there is the 16th hole that has a pond I need to get over using a fairway wood. It is the second shot on the hole and the slope of the fairway is down towards the water. Too often I strike it with a low trajectory and it doesn't carry the pond.

    Any suggestions?

  • #2
    Originally posted by Ron I View Post
    At a course I play, there is the 16th hole that has a pond I need to get over using a fairway wood. It is the second shot on the hole and the slope of the fairway is down towards the water. Too often I strike it with a low trajectory and it doesn't carry the pond.

    Any suggestions?
    Hi Ron,

    Apart from the water looming below, I think using a fairway wood on a downhill slope can be one of the tougher shots anyone faces, and the trajectory will naturally be lower than usual. That said, I wonder if the added variable of the pond below is perhaps (maybe subconsciously) causing you to try to lift the ball in the air in an effort to help it over the water thus causing a thin shot and making the trajectory even lower. I don't know if this is the case, but it's just a thought.

    While this is counterintuitive, maybe an image that would work for you is feeling like you're going to compress the ball into the pond below you and this will better allow you to follow the slope and send the momentum down the hill which will give you more center-of-clubface flush contact and actually launch the ball higher and carry the pond.

    Beyond that suggestion, I searched Shawn's videos and I'm not finding a specific one where he uses a fairway wood on a downhill slope (maybe Gary knows of one). However, as you know, the Chairman has several downhill slope videos, and maybe reviewing those will give you something to key in on, e.g., toe open the front foot more than usual for balance; maintaining secondary tilt; keeping the weight on the inside of forward leg like the one leg swing drill; the takeaway and backswing momentum feeling like it goes UP the slope while the throughswing momentum feeling like it goes DOWN the slope. I'll post a few of these videos here for your convenience . . .



    Note: In this one Ron there's a question in the Comment Section and an answer from Shawn regarding a long shot over water from a downhill lie. Shawn recommends a 4 wood, and he also says it depends on how much slope there is and that some holes just aren't designed well. Maybe this is the case in your situation. So maybe, from a course strategy standpoint, it would be better to use less than driver off the tee for example to put you in a more favorable spot for your second shot.

    And here's an unlisted one on slopes from Shawn's Live Series (downhill part is at the beginning of this video) . . .



    Also, there's this one on downhill slopes from the Premium Channel, and toward the end of this one Shawn uses a driver off of a tee to simulate a downhill slope shot . . .

    Edit: Woops, I just noticed that this Premium video was accessible without logging in, so I removed the link that I previously posted. Go to the Premium Channel to see this downhill slope video.

    Finally, speaking of driver off of a downhill slope, here's one more video just for inspiration . . .



    Hope something in here helps!
    Last edited by Cally; 07-15-2017, 10:13 AM. Reason: Remove link to Premium video

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks Cally. I am going to try your suggestion about trying to feel like I am going to compress the ball into the pond. I am going out early with a lot of pond balls (both past and soon to be pond balls LOL) and see if I can get something figured out.

      I have to admit that subconsciously the water does play a factor when striking the ball, especially since if you slice the ball the pond is longer and if you hook the ball you may land safe but often go into another pond. It is a challenging par 5 hole!

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Ron I View Post
        Thanks Cally. I am going to try your suggestion about trying to feel like I am going to compress the ball into the pond. I am going out early with a lot of pond balls (both past and soon to be pond balls LOL) and see if I can get something figured out.

        I have to admit that subconsciously the water does play a factor when striking the ball, especially since if you slice the ball the pond is longer and if you hook the ball you may land safe but often go into another pond. It is a challenging par 5 hole!
        I hope this works for you Ron! Let me know how it goes. Just wondering, since this is a par 5 hole, how much would you have left for a third shot into the green if you lay up just short of the pond with your second shot?

        Comment


        • #5
          Cally, 16 is an interesting par 5 hole with a severe dogleg right. The first pond is on the right side starts about 155 yards. On the left side starts a hill that the course lets grow and has some tall thick grass. And the fairway isn't fair. It is ranges between 30 and 40 yards of pretty severe downhill (could be above or below feet), less severe downhill and slightly downhill. So my options are to lay up short of the water, lay up 10 to 20 yards onto the fairway where the downslope isn't severe or go to driver or 5 wood. The landing area for the driver is good only if you land on the fairway (20 -30yards at landing area).
          In most case scenarios your 2nd shat has to go over the pond on the right. The longer you are on your drive the less pond you have to carry. Your second shot not only has to be over the first pond on the right but short of the pond on the left that goes to end of the green, The fairway here is interesting. It starts narrow 40 yards and gets wider to about 70 yards. So the safer 2nd shots needs to carry longer to find a safer bigger landing area which also is closer to the green.
          Of course your 3rd shot has to carry the pond to land on the green which is rather large. And of course there is a pond behind the green if you hit it too long,

          So to answer your question: If I lay up short of the pond around 150, my carry of the pond ranges about 150 to 210 on the right. Now the landing area for the 150 is about 30 yards deep and widens to about 70 yards at the 210. So the smart play is to go for more distance because you have more margin of error if you have a slice or hook.

          Right now I am playing a 6i off tee and I land in the fairway 160 to 170 yards which gives me the chance to hit my fairway wood to about 100yds left to the green.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi Cally, Hi Ron, Hi Everyone,

            I could not find a video by Shawn using a fairway wood on a downhill lie.

            This could be a good video by Shawn to make because there are very few available using fairway woods on uneven lies.

            We do know the following per Wisdom In Golf.
            1. A Downhill golf shot is a One Leg Shot. See the Off Season Training Series 10, Premium Channel video https://youtu.be/Gwf3B7dr254
            2. You want to stay Balanced and Centered on the inside of your forward leg.
            3. Ball Position is the same as a flat lie.
            4. Full Swing - Downhill Slopes Premium Channel video https://youtu.be/uLvJn-oKUns
            5. One Leg Drill, Premium Channel Video https://youtu.be/OEsfktZrf1M

            Comment


            • #7
              Cally and Gary, Thanks for the advice.

              I dropped a half dozen pond balls on a downhill lie. Instead of the fairway wood, I used a 4 hybrid. 4 landed safely over the pond. 3 in great position to hit my third shot over the next pond and onto the green. 1 hooked and made it over the pond, but it rolled into the next pond. 1 was a low trajectory strike that almost made it.

              I learned that I don't want to get tense, grip the club too tight or swing harder. I want to see the shot and set up so I strike the ball first (at the dandelion stem). BTW Gary #3 Ball position is not the same as a flat lie. I take a couple of practice swings and see where the club is hitting the ground. Then I move or set up to the ball with my club on the ground where it is striking the ground.

              I will be using my 4 hybrid as a strategy for now. I do think hitting a fairway wood on a downhill would be a good video for Shawn to make. We all have downhill lies on the fairway. Luckily most don't need to carry over water.

              Comment


              • Cally
                Cally commented
                Editing a comment
                Glad you found something that works for you Ron. A hybrid is a nice club to have as an option. I'm sure the higher launch of the hybrid counteracted the downhill slope and probably gave you a similar trajectory or somewhat closer trajectory to your 5 wood off of a flat lie.

                As far as strategy on a long par 5 in general (notwithstanding water or other obstacles to navigate), I've found better success going with a fairway wood or a hybrid for my first and second shots followed by a wedge or a short iron for my approach shot. On these long par 5 holes I'm content to get out of there with a par, and thrilled if I make a birdie with this strategy rather than a pull hook with my driver off the tee because I was trying to put too much effort into the swing in an attempt to get on the green in two.
                Last edited by Cally; 4 weeks ago.

              • Gary
                Gary commented
                Editing a comment
                Hi Ron,

                At minute 2:30 of the Premium Channel video Full Swing - Downhill Slopes, Shawn indicated the following:

                "As far as ball position is concerned very much the same ball position as you would normally use to hit your fade or your draw."

                When I heard that I thought it meant the ball position was the same as on a flat lie. So sorry about the error. Thanks for getting this corrected.

                Where I live pretty much every golf course is flat. So I learned a lot from your specific question.

                Thanks again Ron,
                Gary
            Working...
            X