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  • Putter

    Any advice on putter? Thinking about buying a new one for a while. I still use the putter that came with my first golf club serie bought a very long time ago. Wilson Prostaff OD plus. I actually like it but it's Christmas time and I feel like treating myself. I went to a golf shop a week ago to fix a broken club head and I had a look at the putters. The choice is overwhelming! Many types of head. What putter do you own yourself? Any advice welcome.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	putter1.jpg Views:	1 Size:	37.6 KB ID:	10244
    Click image for larger version  Name:	putter2.jpg Views:	1 Size:	38.2 KB ID:	10245
    Last edited by Ferko; 12-13-2017, 04:43 PM.

  • #2
    Hi Ferko,
    Something that I put together many years ago?
    Seems to have retained its relevancy, tho?

    (apologies if the upload failed.....file's on an OLD drive?)
    May need WIG technoid-hellp?

    dude abides
    Attached Files
    "OLD" Forum Participation

    Entry Date: 18-JAN-2011
    Posts: 1813
    Thank You: 1048

    "Be water, my friends"

    Comment


    • #3
      Sorry guys....
      Here's the TEXT of that old file:

      Copyright 2010 April 25, 2010
      +/- 1310 words
      One Time Rights

      Bill McCabe
      Email:

      Putter Selection 1.01

      Is your putter your Friend? Or your Enemy? Is she with you or against you? Is she a trusted ally who rides up in the front seat of the golf cart with you? Or a fickle temptress that you’d be happy to trade for a bag of tees and a hot dog?

      Well, as in life, happiness often depends upon who we choose to spend our lives with and how we chose them. Choose wisely and your journey through life can be a joy. Choose poorly and it can be a miserable ride. Is your putter your friend? Have you chosen wisely? It’s not necessarily always going to be the prettiest one. Do you have an idea of what to look for?

      There are five basic, interrelated concepts worth considering when you set out to select a putter:
      1. Your stroke “SHAPE”
      2. Your POSTURE
      3. How the Putter is BALANCED
      4. Alignment and Sight Lines
      5. Locate the SWEET SPOT
      Let’s see if we can’t make some sense out of them.

      There are two basic stroke “shapes”. That is to say, what kind of PATH does your putter take on its way from and through the ball. This path or “shape” is not generally a conscious decision on the part of the player; but a natural, instinctive motion that just is what it is. But being able to identify WHICH it is can be key.

      The first of these “shapes” is what I refer to as a “door” swing. It is actually a mini-regular swing. Coming away from the ball the putter head swings a bit open on the way back, and rotates back through to a bit of a closed position after impact; like opening and closing a door. Again, this opening and closing motion is not an active effort, but a merely a natural occurrence in which the putter face remains square to the PATH of the swing. Many of Golf’s best putters appear to be “door swingers”. Amongst them: Ben Crenshaw and Phil Mickelson .

      The other stroke shape is more of a straight back, straight through (SBST) motion during which the putter face remains more square to the TARGET LINE throughout the swing. I believe that most of us think this is us, or certainly this is how we’d prefer to putt given our choice. But which one are we? It can certainly be difficult to tell.

      One clue lies in our body mechanics that stem from the posture in which we’re the most comfortable putting. Some of us putt in a pretty upright posture while others of us crouch over a bit more. My basic rule of thumb is that the more upright you are when you putt, the better chance is that your swing path is a “door” shape. The more bent over you are, the more likely you’re a SBST. Here’s why.

      When you swing any golf club, your shoulders rotate around your spine at about ninety degrees. Makes sense, right? Well, the more upright you are, the more VERTICAL your spine is and the more HORIZONTALLY your shoulders will rotate. This more horizontal motion means that your arms have to revolve AROUND your body, resulting in the putter “opening” and “closing” during the swing. The more bent over you are, the less vertical is your spine, and the resultant shoulder rotation will become more and more VERTICAL, right? This gives your arms more room to rotate UNDER your torso. This more vertical shoulder motion lends itself better to a more straight back, straight through putter path. So, in general the shape of your putter swing is largely determined by your posture.

      So now I know which posture I have and how that might impact my stroke path, but how do I determine which putter fits my stroke the best? It all comes down to putter BALANCE, and there’s a simple exercise you can do to determine that.

      Lay the putter shaft across your palm and note how the face of the putter “hangs”. Some putters will hang with the face pretty much vertical (toe-balanced); others with the face more horizontal (face-balanced). Many putters will hang somewhere in between at about 45 degrees or so. The basic rule is the closer the face “hang” comes to vertical, the more supportive the putter will be to a “door” swing. The closer the putter comes to being face-balanced, the more supportive it will be for a SBST stroke.

      Technically it comes down to some relationships to the axis of rotation around the shaft location, yada, yada, yada. We can get into that some other time.

      Do you know where the sweet spot on your putter is? Most of us would say: “Of course! In the middle of the face, dummy!” Well, not so fast. On many putters it IS clear that the Designer INTENDS that you think the sweet spot is in the middle. But is it? Have you ever done a “percussion test” on your putter? Try this. It might surprise you?

      Hold the putter out in front of you in pretty much the relation to the ground that it’d be in when you putt. Take a golf ball and firmly tap the ball on the putter face. Start with where you think the sweet spot is. Does the face deflect; or rotate when you hit it? Or does it stay square? If it rotates (what I call “rattles”), move your tap up and down the putter face until you find the spot at which the face does not react to the force of the ball hitting it. THAT’S your sweet spot. Not necessarily where you thought, eh?

      In my experience, I’ve found that the closer the putter comes to being face-balanced, the closer the sweet spot comes to what one would visually expect. That’s because face-balanced putters have a shaft angle that’s pretty much aligned with the center of the face. But there we go with that technical junk again. The closer the putter comes to being toe-balanced, the nearer the sweet spot is to the SHAFT; not the middle of the face!

      One last point. What’s easier to aim more accurately: a RIFLE or a PISTOL? Now, I know that many of you have never fired a firearm in your life (I never had either until I got drafted and went to Basic Training?) but, in the movies, have you ever seen a sniper in a bell-tower with a Pistol? (re: Saving Private Ryan; one of my favorite movies. The end makes my cry every time.) Of course the sniper has a RIFLE. Why? Because it can be more ACCURATELY AIMED. The length of the rifle lengthens the sight-line; critical to aiming.

      With a pistol, with all due respect to broken cheekbones, you don’t shoot a pistol with the butt pressed up against your face, do you? No. You extend your arm out straight. That extension lengthens your sight-line, and increases your ability to aim. Let me introduce you to the “sight-line” of a putter.

      There are two basic types of putters; generally categorized as Blades and Mallets. The difference between the two is basically the DEPTH of the putter head from face to rear. The longer that distance from face to rear is, the LONGER the SIGHT-LINE of the putter is. So, in general (in my experience and opinion) Mallet putters are easier to aim more effectively than their Blade style brethren. There, I’ve said it.

      So. If, at the end of the day, you feel as though you’re not comfortable with your putter; IF you feel as though you’re fighting to keep in on track. It’s entirely possible that you ARE because your tool does not match up with what is natural for you. Think about it. Having a putter that more closely matches your swing could help you make more putts.

      "OLD" Forum Participation

      Entry Date: 18-JAN-2011
      Posts: 1813
      Thank You: 1048

      "Be water, my friends"

      Comment


      • #4
        Evnroll, Ping Ketsch, or MLA putters. All have tech that help on those unfortunate miss hits. (Kind of like playing a cavity back vs. a blade iron). I personally have an Evnroll. If you go to My Golf Spy and search the "blog" posts on putters, they have tested a large number of putters, and the info will be helpful to finding the one for you. The info from Costa103 is very good on finding which type of putter to fit you.

        Evnroll has 8 or 9 different models, so you can pick the style that fits your stroke and preferences. So does MLA. There are a number of Evnroll reviews on Youtube.

        Comment


        • #5
          Shawn had a putting video (that I can't find at the moment) and he was using a long putter which he really liked that worked well with this putting technique. I thought he said in the video he would be stocking them (I could be wrong).

          Comment


          • #6
            I also noticed in a VERY recent video (Shawn vs. Matt on a simulator): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pPO345dYg-8&t=99s

            That Shawn is putting CROSS-HANDED! (check out at 6:00 mark

            Encouraging to see since I've been putting cross-handed (lead-hand-LOW) for over THIRTY years!!

            dude abides
            "OLD" Forum Participation

            Entry Date: 18-JAN-2011
            Posts: 1813
            Thank You: 1048

            "Be water, my friends"

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by COSTA103 View Post
              Hi Ferko,
              Something that I put together many years ago?
              Seems to have retained its relevancy, tho?

              (apologies if the upload failed.....file's on an OLD drive?)
              May need WIG technoid-hellp?

              dude abides
              Thanks Costa. I read your article carefully and there is a lot of food for thoughts. I could open the file in Word by the way. I really need to read it again to digest all the information (probably need to read it a few times!). Sounds like a good read for the week-end while sipping a cup of coffee and plenty of time to reflect.

              Comment


              • #8
                Thought this was well explained by fancy dress people on the golf channel.
                http://www.golfchannel.com/media?gui...d-915c20ba8921

                Comment


                • COSTA103
                  COSTA103 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  ....not even sure her FACTS are correct?
                  To my understanding MOI (Moment-Of-Inertia; resistance to twisting) is less a function of "mass behind the putter-face" than it is the amount of
                  HEEL/TOE WEIGHTING off the putter design (note the big bulbs on the perimeter of the putter she has in her hands?)

                  dude abides

                  P.S. I don't look as good as she does, tho.....

              • #9
                Originally posted by COSTA103 View Post
                Hi Ferko,
                Something that I put together many years ago?
                Seems to have retained its relevancy, tho?

                (apologies if the upload failed.....file's on an OLD drive?)
                May need WIG technoid-hellp?

                dude abides
                Read the article again this morning. Very insighful. Here is my take.

                1. Your stroke “SHAPE”
                Door swing and straight back straight through (SBST). I guess this is similar to the notion of arc and linear.

                2. Your POSTURE
                Upright and crouch. Posture defines shape i.e. vertical = door shape; bent over = SBST.

                I agree with your analysis that in the end an horizontal swing with bring more arc and a vertical swing will be more linear. However, I'm not following you on the cause. Someone with an horizontal swing will be more bent forward at address and therefore will be further from the ball than someone with a vertical swing who is more upright and therefore closer to the ball. If you're further from the ball you'll have more of an arc than if you're closer. In an extreme case, if the club is perpandicular to the ground, it will go back and forth linearily like a simple pendulum.

                3. How the Putter is BALANCED
                Putter shaft across your palm:
                Face pretty much vertical = toe-balanced - more for a door swing
                Face more horizontal = face-balanced - more for a SBST stroke
                Many putters in between.

                4. Alignment and Sight Lines
                Blades vs Mallets. Mallet putter = longer sight line = easier to aim

                5. Locate the SWEET SPOT
                I did the exercice to locate the sweet spot of my putter (toe balanced) and the sweet spot was closer to the shaft than I thought (I thought the sweet spot would be in the middle).

                Thanks again for sharing. It feels I got a crash course in putter in +/- 1310 words!

                Comment


                • #10
                  Originally posted by Ferko View Post

                  2. Your POSTURE
                  Upright and crouch. Posture defines shape i.e. vertical = door shape; bent over = SBST.

                  I agree with your analysis that in the end an horizontal swing with bring more arc and a vertical swing will be more linear. However, I'm not following you on the cause. Someone with an horizontal swing will be more bent forward at address and therefore will be further from the ball than someone with a vertical swing who is more upright and therefore closer to the ball. If you're further from the ball you'll have more of an arc than if you're closer. In an extreme case, if the club is perpandicular to the ground, it will go back and forth linearily like a simple pendulum.
                  I believe that your POSTURE dictates your STROKE shape....NOT the other way around?

                  Test it for yourself.
                  Stand up right now (without a putter) and assume your comfortable putting posture, and make a putting motion...
                  (It's what I call your "Airport Swing"?... more on that later if anyone's interested...)
                  You were able to do it, right?

                  Now, all that's left is to find a putter LENGTH that fills in the distance between your HANDS and the GROUND?

                  To your point, (in my observation and experience), those with more "crouched" postures often use SHORTER putters?

                  We, all too often, try to force-fit a STANDARD 35-inch putter into our posture?
                  Doesn't necessarily work that way.
                  Even if I buy a putter off the rack, I (almost) always have it RE-CUT to fit ME.
                  (sometimes I can salvage the GRIP, but most times it adds onto the expense of the putter...

                  dude abides




                  "OLD" Forum Participation

                  Entry Date: 18-JAN-2011
                  Posts: 1813
                  Thank You: 1048

                  "Be water, my friends"

                  Comment


                  • Ken Robie
                    Ken Robie commented
                    Editing a comment
                    When I finally settled on my Nike Method1 putter I tried all different lengths to see which one felt the most comfortable on my back after an extended putting session. I ended up with a 33". I believe posture is huge on your putting success, but I also believe your physical fitness, (can you stay in that putting posture is the key).

                • #11
                  I tried that the tupper type putter grip that Shawn demo in one of his video this summer. Its the putter grip that shaft lines up more along the back of the fingers and knuckles then the thumb side of the grip Works well. Felt like I didnt have to bounce the putter on the ground as much to feel like my fingers line up for breaking putts. Though forward press felt a bit odd

                  Comment


                  • #12
                    Watched a video on putter. They detailed a bit more the different types of putter from face-balanced putters to toe-balanced putters.

                    Center-shaft putter
                    Putter face toward the sky. Vertical swing parallel to the feet. Difficult to play because need to "hit" the center of the face.

                    Click image for larger version  Name:	putter center-shaft.jpg Views:	1 Size:	40.9 KB ID:	10328

                    Face-balanced putter
                    The most common putter. People are a bit further from the ball. Put parallel to the feet. Putter face nearly toward the sky.

                    Click image for larger version  Name:	putter face balanced.jpg Views:	1 Size:	34.3 KB ID:	10329

                    Hands-forward putter (didn't get the name in the video)
                    Hands are slightly forward. Putter nearly in the extension of the left arm. Can be used to put parallel or in arc.

                    Click image for larger version  Name:	putter main avant.jpg Views:	1 Size:	35.6 KB ID:	10330

                    Spider
                    Face slightly inclined. Goes toward the toe-balanced putter. Hands slightly forward. A bit more arc. Used by many pro e.g. Sergio Garcia.

                    Click image for larger version  Name:	spider.jpg Views:	1 Size:	37.0 KB ID:	10331

                    Toe-balance putter
                    Very technical putter. Toe toward the ground. Golfer has a lot of angle (bent forward) and is further from the ball. Hands low. Very pronounced arc. Used by Phil Mickelson.

                    Click image for larger version  Name:	toe.jpg Views:	1 Size:	55.7 KB ID:	10332

                    Toe-balance putters means putting in arc and being further from the ball.
                    Face-balanced putter means putting in line and being closer to the ball.

                    Comment


                    • #13
                      In this article the author talks about the position relative to the ball i.e. eyes directly over the ball vs eye line inside the target line. The author is then talking about using a center-shafted putter (I assume face-balanced) in the first case and a heel-shafted putter (I assume toe-balanced) in the second case. Any opinion on this?

                      https://www.golftipsmag.com/instruct.../eye-position/

                      The proper putting setup is an important ingredient in a golfer's success. Setting the eyes in the correct position is one of the critical factors that's often overlooked. On that subject, there are two schools of thought.

                      One method is to set the eyes directly over the ball, along the target line. If you putt this way, a center-shafted putter is probably the right tool to use. With your eyes directly over the ball, you're setting up to take the putter straight back and straight through, never deviating from the target line. A center-shafted putter is made precisely for this type of stroke because the clubhead is balanced to swing like a pendulum. Brad Faxon and Mark O'Meara putt this way.

                      The other technique is to situate your eye line inside the target line so that you look out toward the ball. If you're more comfortable in this position, a heel-shafted putter is probably best. Ben Crenshaw and Lee Trevino have had tremendous success with this method over the years. When Crenshaw putts, for example, his putterhead swings slightly inside the line, squares up at impact, then swings back inside on the followthrough, much like the arc on a full swing. The putterhead effectively swings like a door opening and closing on a fixed hinge. The fact that the shaft is in the heel of the clubhead accomplishes this stroke with immeasurable ease, but timing is at a premium.

                      Comment


                      • #14
                        Pretty complete description.
                        https://mygolfspy.com/putter-fitting-101/

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