Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Anyone else putting to die into the hole?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Anyone else putting to die into the hole?

    I have been trying hard to break two bad putting habits.

    1. Apex read.
    2. Ball speed that 'dies' into the hole.

    I have found the first quite easy to quit because im visualising where the ball needs to roll into the hole. But the second !!!! It seems im wired to have glory drops deadweight into the hole! ....and I agree it is far more difficult to achieve. Any advice on re-programming the old brain ??

  • #2
    Hi guys,
    Dave Pelz (love him or hate him) once did a study that concluded that the OPTIMUM speed at which the ball is travelling that BEST optimizes the ball's likelihood of entering the hole is the speed at which (if the ball were to MISS the hole) would roll SEVENTEEN inches BEYOND the hole?

    Speaking for myself, I'm willing to give Mr. Pelz his due on the science of rolling golf balls....

    Could it be as simple as to "re-program" the old brain to propel the ball 17" PAST the hole?

    (makes one wonder at what speed WATER would flow into the hole???)

    Be water, my friends

    dude abides
    "OLD" Forum Participation

    Entry Date: 18-JAN-2011
    Posts: 1813
    Thank You: 1048

    "Be water, my friends"

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by COSTA103 View Post
      Hi guys,
      Dave Pelz (love him or hate him) once did a study that concluded that the OPTIMUM speed at which the ball is travelling that BEST optimizes the ball's likelihood of entering the hole is the speed at which (if the ball were to MISS the hole) would roll SEVENTEEN inches BEYOND the hole?

      Speaking for myself, I'm willing to give Mr. Pelz his due on the science of rolling golf balls....

      Could it be as simple as to "re-program" the old brain to propel the ball 17" PAST the hole?

      (makes one wonder at what speed WATER would flow into the hole???)

      Be water, my friends

      dude abides
      Dude

      I wondered that as well - and that's the speed I try to get the putts to roll at near the hole..

      how does water move across the green..?

      does it seek its own level?

      and at what speed?

      cheers for now

      k_f
      from the hidden Ravine below 13th at CN G&CC
      tu nunquam hic

      Secret Swing Tech c/o Pigaman @ Crackpot Labs

      wisdomingolf.com/index.php?option=com_ku...&id=47972&Itemid=225

      let energy instead of style define you.

      Proud Member 'Quote Yourself Club'

      Comment


      • #4
        I like to let the ball die near the hole and that works not bad since years for me.

        Comment


        • #5
          I just re-read Harvey Penick's Little Red Book, and he liked the ball dying at the hole.

          Comment


          • #6
            What you lose in feel you might gain in ease of execution? The ball does deviate more at lower speed thats for sure.

            Comment


            • #7
              Not a fan of the putt dying at the hole. Trying to hit a 2 -3 foot putt that just rolls in is more difficult because as the speed of the ball slows the more the ball can break more. I have had many balls just roll away from the hole as it approached the hole. Part of the reason for this is caused by the groundskeeper pulling the sod out of the green to create the hole. In doing so the area just around the hole is raised just a bit. Another reason is that the slower the ball rolls the more break has to be played and read.

              I find that at close distances that I make more putts when I hit it firmer to the back of the hole. It makes the shot easier to read because It takes most of the break out of the shot.

              Now for long lag putts, it is great to have the ball die right around the hole.

              Comment


              • #8
                I have been a big fan of dying the ball in the hole. Just my practice. It's what each player feels is best for them, though. I also agree with the philosophy of "never up, never in." But I am not a fan of the "come backer" either.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I changed my putting after meeting Shawn in Germany and have to admit, it was an improvement.
                  Now I see the ball rolling the last 3 feet on the line I determined before and I also see the ball falling in the middle of the hole for downhill putts, or hitting the back of the hole for an uphill putt.
                  Both is a little more, a little faster, than dying at the hole, but not 3 feet beyond the hole, if I miss it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I thought I should post this here instead of starting a new thread.

                    I have spent the past 4 summers taking lessons from Shawn working primarily on the full swing and as a result I lost what touch I had in putting. I went through 4 putters, 1 each summer trying to find my touch, but with little success until I did 3 three things this early summer: 1. had a few putting lessons; 2. I remembered something that Costa posted a long time ago on the old forum about using a ball with the lowest compression possible. So I bought the neon yellow/green with black markings Chrome Soft with Truvis technology; 3. I took an Aimpoint green reading clinic.

                    So I switched back to my old putter and started using the new ball, applied the Aimpoint green reading technique and distance control for lag puts are dramatically improved and my shorter puts are firmer. On most of my missed putts, I'm usually within 1 foot at the most past the hole on the high side. End result: way more confidence in my putting.

                    A couple of side notes: a hard faced putter with soft balls, soft faced(inserts) putter with hard balls is suggested; the Pelz 17" past the hole has been debunked by Geoff Mangum. Sorry Costa. http://puttingzone.com/Downloads/OptimalPutting.pdf

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Certainly with short downhill and sidehill putts gentle pace is important. Was out today after not lifting up a putter for 2 months and noticed that for those shorter putts where there is a lot of borrow I tend to have more confidence when I try to tap either at the outer 1/3 of the putter blade (toe) or try to deflect off the an open toe on purpose

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X